Latest news on Russia and the war in Ukraine

Officials push to officially end partial mobilization in Russia

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting with Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow, Russia October 28, 2022.

Mikhail Metzel | sputnik | Reuters

Opposition party members from the Karelia region in northwestern Russia have called on President Vladimir Putin to issue a decree officially ending the partial mobilization of troops.

The controversial partial mobilization of 300,000 Russian citizens, announced at the end of September, caused an exodus of men from the country and sparked protests against the project. A month later, Putin and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu announced the completion of the mobilization. However, no formal legislative changes have been made.

Emilia Slabunova and Inna Boluchevskaya, Yabloko party deputies in the Karelia Legislative Assembly, said in an appeal that “the public speeches of the defense minister, the statements of the president and his press secretary that ‘the end has been fixed'”. Partial mobilization completed’ are not normative acts and therefore have no legal force. »

They also noted that parts of the initial mobilization decree continue to apply, despite its announced completion.

“This fact, say the deputies, affects the psychological state of society, is a source of anxiety and increased anxiety in Russian families and working groups, and many people have health problems,” they said. they stated.

“The announcements must be supported by an executive order,” they added.

—Rocio Fabbro

Russia revives Soviet-era Moskvich car brand

The relaunch of Moskvich vehicles comes as Russia strives for a self-sufficient economy as the country’s finances continue to be stifled by sanctions and other ramifications of its invasion of Ukraine.

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Russia has restarted production of the Soviet Moskvich car at a former Renault factory, according to truckmaker Kamaz.

It comes as the Kremlin yearns for a self-sufficient economy as the country’s finances continue to be stifled by Western sanctions and other ramifications of its unprovoked invasion of Ukraine.

Read the full story here.

—Hannah Ward-Glenton

A Russian rocket attack would have left Kyiv without water and electricity

Ukrainian authorities reportedly said the capital, Kyiv, was left without power after Russian airstrikes targeted critical infrastructure, while water supplies were also cut.

A two-story building was damaged as a result of the rocket attack, with Ukraine’s regional military administration reporting that three people were killed and six injured.

—Sam Meredith

Rescuers search a destroyed two-story maternity hospital in Zaporizhzhia

A photo shows a room in the destroyed two-storey building of the maternity hospital in the city of Vilnyansk in the southern Zaporizhzhia region on November 23, 2022, amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Katerina Klochko | AFP | Getty Images

Rescuers search a destroyed two-story maternity hospital in the city of Vilnyansk, in the south of the Zaporizhzhia region.

“As a result of a rocket attack on the territory of the local hospital, the two-storey building of the maternity ward was destroyed,” they said in a statement. There was “a woman with a newborn baby as well as a doctor” inside the building at the time, they added. The baby died as the woman and doctor were rescued from the rubble, rescuers said.

Rescuers clear debris from the destroyed two-story maternity hospital in the city of Vilnyansk in the southern Zaporizhzhia region on November 23, 2022, amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Katerina Klochko | AFP | Getty Images

Rescuers rest in front of the destroyed two-storey maternity hospital in the city of Vilnyansk in the southern Zaporizhzhia region on November 23, 2022, amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Katerina Klochko | AFP | Getty Images

Rescuers clear debris from the destroyed two-story maternity hospital in the city of Vilnyansk in southern Zaporizhzhia region on November 23, 2022, amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Katerina Klochko | AFP | Getty Images

—Katerina Klochko | AFP | Getty Images

Ukrainian officials say one dead killed in Russian missile strike on Kyiv

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has promised that winter shelters with basic services such as heating, water and a first aid kit will be freely available to citizens across the country.

Nurphoto | Nurphoto | Getty Images

Ukrainian authorities said Russian forces had launched a new wave of missile strikes on critical infrastructure in its capital, Kyiv.

A statement from the Kyiv City Military Administration said a two-story building was damaged as a result of the impact, one person was killed and another injured. Authorities have advised residents to stay in shelters until the air raid is over.

—Sam Meredith

European Parliament declares Moscow a state sponsor of terrorism

In a largely symbolic gesture, the European Parliament designated Russia as a state sponsor of terrorism, claiming that deliberate attacks by Kremlin forces and their proxies against civilians in Ukraine constitute war crimes. Russia denies targeting civilians.

European lawmakers, recognizing that the European Union cannot officially designate states as sponsors of terrorism, have called on the bloc to further isolate Moscow in the international arena.

Ukrainian Zelenskyy had lobbied for the United States and others to recognize Russia as a state sponsor of terrorism. US President Joe Biden rejected those calls in early September, fearing such a move would have “unintended consequences” for Ukraine and the world.

—Sam Meredith

Ukrainian Zelenskyy promises shelters with heating and water as winter approaches

Zelenskyy said winter shelters with basic services such as heat, water and a first aid kit would be freely available to citizens across the country.

Documents | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said in his overnight speech that winter shelters with basic services such as heat, water and a first aid kit would be freely available to citizens across the country.

He said these “invincibility“Centres would be needed to support populations in the event of further Russian attacks on the country’s energy system.

More than 4,000 centers have been prepared so far, Zelenskyy said. “I am on [that] by helping each other, we can all get through this winter together,” he added.

—Sam Meredith

Zaporizhzhia governor says newborn baby killed in missile strike in Russia

People watch as the search and rescue operation continues at the site of a Russian missile strike on a two-storey building, in Ukraine’s Vilnyansk, Zaporizhzhia region.

Edition of the future | Edition of the future | Getty Images

According to the governor of the Zaporizhzhia region, a night missile attack on a maternity ward of a small hospital in southern Ukraine killed a newborn baby.

Oleksandr Starukh said via Telegram that the “huge missiles” were Russian. “Grief fills our hearts,” he added.

CNBC was unable to independently verify the information.

—Sam Meredith

European Union announces $2.5 billion in new aid to Ukraine

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen delivers the State of the European Union address to the European Parliament, in Strasbourg, France, September 14, 2022.

yves herman | Reuters

The European Union has sent an additional $2.5 billion to help Ukraine, according to the country’s Prime Minister, Denys Shmyhal.

Shmyhal said in a tweet on Tuesday that the EU “disbursed 2.5 billion euros [around $2.57 billion] in macro-financial assistance.”

Tweet:

The massive cash injection is the EU’s latest effort to help Ukraine fight off the Russian invasion.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen recently announced that the EU will provide at the top to $18 billion in financial aid in 2023 as the country takes on Russia.

-Brian Schwartz

Treasury issues new guidance on shipping Russian oil ahead of G7 price cap

The Treasury Department issued new guidelines for shipping Russian oil ahead of a price cap expected in early December.

The guidance complements the recent UK publication Strategies outlining how national service providers can continue to transport oil by sea while respecting the price cap on Russian oil imagined by the G7 countries, the EU and Australia.

“We are taking these steps to allow market participants to implement the price cap policy as easily as possible from December 5, in line with the coalition’s objectives of allowing the Russians to maintain the flow of foreign oil while cutting Kremlin revenue,” a senior Treasury official said.

The price cap aims to deprive Russia of a source of funding to continue its war against Ukraine. It comes into effect on December 5.

—Chelsey Cox

Iran may be ‘guilty of crimes against humanity’ after sending arms to Russia, UK ambassador says

Karen Pierce, Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, briefs journalists after the Security Council meeting on the situation in the Middle East (Syria) at the United Nations headquarters in New York, on December 20, 2019.

Europanewswire/gado | Stock Photos | Getty Images

Iran could be guilty of crimes against humanity for producing weapons for Russia to be used in Ukraine, British Ambassador to the United States Karen Pierce said in an interview.

“Even at this late stage, I think the Iranians need to think about how they might be guilty of crimes against humanity by supplying these weapons to the Russians,” Pierce said. Told Andrea Mitchell on MSNBC.

The Washington Post reported that Iran has agreed to start manufacturing hundreds of unmanned drones on Russian soil.

These weapons are expected to be used in the conflict with Ukraine.

-Brian Schwartz

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